Rothesay set to see the fruits of its labour

Fyne Futures and the 'Incredible Edible Bute' group hard at work on the  accessible raised beds in the Chapel Hill car park back in June.
Fyne Futures and the 'Incredible Edible Bute' group hard at work on the accessible raised beds in the Chapel Hill car park back in June.

The local community is set to reap the rewards of all the hard work put in at the community beds installed earlier this year in Rothesay.

Fyne Futures, in collaboration with Incredible Edible Bute, and as part of the Bute Carbon Free Food project, will be holding an open day on Sunday, October 21 at the Chapel Hill raised beds at 1pm.

The theme of the day is to highlight how buying your food locally can help reduce the carbon footprint of the island.

Sandy Ogilvie from Fyne Futures said: “Where food travels less distance from ‘field to fork’ there are fewer emissions and less environmental damage.

“Food’s carbon footprint, or ‘foodprint’, is the greenhouse gas emissions produced by farming, transporting and processing the food you eat.

“Buying food from local producers and retailers reduces and, in some cases, eliminates a stage in this.

“Reducing your foodprint doesn’t end when you finish your meal. Composting your leftover organic waste is great if you have space to do so, and is an excellent way of returning organic matter to the earth. But first be sure there isn’t another meal in your leftovers.

“Research has shown that organic waste in landfill degrades to produce methane- a greenhouse gas 25-30 times more efficient at trapping heat than carbon dioxide.

“Bute produces a wide range of food and drink for an island of its size. If you wish to support these providers, then come along to the open day to join in and learn about your ‘foodprint’.”