Call for tougher sanctions for livestock worrying

NFU Scotland has called for tougher penalties for sheep worrying.
NFU Scotland has called for tougher penalties for sheep worrying.

NFU Scotland is calling for harsher penalties for those who let their dogs attack livestock, following the sentencing of a Rothesay man earlier this week.

On March 4, Nicholas Rowley, of East Princes Street, allowed four dogs for which he was responsible to seriously injure and kill 17 sheep on farmland near Inveraray. The total damages are estimated to be around £4,100. The injuries inflicted on the sheep were so severe that photographs taken afterwards were deemed unsuitable for publication.

Mr Rowley previously pleaded guilty at Lochgilphead Sheriff Court under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 and last Tuesday Sheriff Thomas Ward sentenced Mr Rowley, formerly of Lochgilphead, to an 80-hour community payback order to be completed within three months.

NFU Scotland has stepped up its efforts in recent years on livestock worrying, calling for tougher sanctions for those who let their dogs attack livestock.

Andrew McCornick, NFU Scotland President, said: “This case is a prime example of the importance of full and proportionate compensation for those impacted by livestock worrying, a key ask of NFU Scotland in any future framework.

“It was noted during the hearing the maximum fine that could be imposed was £1,000 under current legislation. Livestock worrying continues to be a blight, and greater sanctions and further public awareness are needed so dog owners are aware of their responsibilities to keep animals under control.”