Grant up for grabs for young musicians

The Agar Trust issues grants ranging from �100 to �1000 to support young people in rural areas with their musical education and career development.

The Agar Trust issues grants ranging from �100 to �1000 to support young people in rural areas with their musical education and career development.

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Are you a talented young musician living in rural Scotland? Then apply by September 30 to The Agar Trust, as you may be eligible for a grant.

The Agar Trust gives grants of £100 to £1000 to support young people with their musical education and career development. It helps them overcome the challenges they face living in rural areas, particularly travelling long distances to participate in tuition, courses, performances, rehearsals and auditions.

To be eligble, you must be aged between 8 and 21, show proven musical skills and potential, and live in rural Scotland. Residency is defined by a Scottish Government map, accessible on the Trust website, and includes much of the Highlands and Islands, Argyll and Bute, Dumfries and Galloway, Scottish Borders, rural Aberdeenshire and Moray.

In April 2015, The Agar Trust made awards to 26 musicians aged between 8 and 21.

Stephanie Kozlowski, 14, an oboist from Thurso, was helped to attend a National Youth Wind Ensemble course at the Royal Scottish Conservatoire. “Being from the far north, it is not easy to attend different courses and I am looking forward to achieving more confidence in playing in an ensemble.”

Donald Martin, 17, a double bass player from Stornoway, received a travel bursary to attend courses in Perth and Edinburgh with the National Youth Orchestra of Scotland. His teacher said, “We don’t have an orchestra on the Isles, so the chance to play with the best of Scotland’s young musicians would have a lasting effect on his musical future.”

The Agar Trust was set up in 2014 by Dr. Janet Macdonald from the estate of her father, Alan Agar, who was an enthusiastic amateur musician. Dr. Macdonald lives in Strathpeffer and spent many years supporting rural students and staff when she worked at the Open University. She has first-hand experience of both the privileges and challenges of rural living.

Visit The Agar Trust for further information and details of how to apply.