Wintry weather warnings for Argyll and Bute

The Met Office has issued yellow 'be aware' weather alerts warning of snow and ice in Argyll and Bute between February 20 and 23.
The Met Office has issued yellow 'be aware' weather alerts warning of snow and ice in Argyll and Bute between February 20 and 23.

The Met Office has issued three separate ‘be aware’ weather warnings for snow and ice in Argyll and Bute in the next few days.

The first applies between 8pm on Friday and 10am on Saturday and advises that rain, sleet or snow showers will lead to icy patches on roads and pavements, although snow is only expected to settle on high ground.

The second warning, between 6am and 5pm on Sunday, advises that sleet and snow showers will tend to turn back to rain except on high ground, although winds of more than 50mph are also expected on coasts and hills which could lead to blizzard conditions on high level routes

The third warning will last for 24 hours throughout Monday and predicts frequent hail, sleet and snow showers, with accumulations of 3-8 centimetres possbile at low levels, and continuing strong winds, with gusts of more than 50mph possible.

For Rothesay itself, the weekend forecast begins with predictions for occasional wintry showers on Friday night, increasing in both strength and frequency through Saturday morning, though the showers should clear to leave some good sunny spells on Saturday afternoon.

On Sunday, temperatures on Bute should be high enough to ensure there’s no sleet and snow, although heavy rain is expected to sweep over the island from mid-morning until late afternoon.

The major problem on Sunday is likely to be the wind: steady southerly and westerly breezes of 25-30mph could gust to almost 50mph, meaning a good chance of warnings of possible disruption to ferry services.

Those wind speeds and gusts are likely to continue for much of Monday; heavy, but hopefully brief, snow showers are possible early on Monday morning, though these should give way to sleet and then rain later in the day as temperatures rise.