Sweet treats at North Bute Primary to boost RNLI funds

Students, parents and teachers all helped out at the RNLI cake sale.
Students, parents and teachers all helped out at the RNLI cake sale.

Bute’s latest fundraising event went ahead last weekend at North Bute Primary School, as students, teachers and parents put on a bake sale for the RNLI.

Weeks of preparation led up to the sale on Friday, September 29, with students from primaries 5, 6 and 7 taking part in various educational activities on the themes of lifeboats, shipbuilding and the nautical story of Grace Darling.

Print Point in Rothesay donated books to sell on the day.

Print Point in Rothesay donated books to sell on the day.

Some of them also made some of the goods on sale, including cakes and jewellery.

They were then hard at work at the schoolhouse in Port Bannatyne, manning various stalls selling goods and taking donations.

The goods on sale and various raffle prizes were donated by the school’s Parent Teacher Association, Print Point, Bute Fabrics, the Mount Stuart Trust and others.

Elizabeth Santos, who recently joined North Bute Primary, coordinated much of the activities leading up to the day, and she was impressed with how the children engaged.

Parents sat down in the school's library for a cake and a chat.

Parents sat down in the school's library for a cake and a chat.

She said: “I thought the sale was wonderful and I was overwhelmed by the support shown from the local community for both the RNLI and our school.

“It was a wonderful day full of joy and happiness with learning interweaved before, during and after the event.

“We are already counting the days to the sale next year!”

Anne Speirs, who has helped out at RNLI fundraising events for more than 20 years, said: “I thought the sale went really well. The children were as enthusiastic and hardworking as they have always been. There was a big attendance of parents, grandparents, friends, the lifeboat committee and local people.

“Apart from the money raised for the RNLI, it is a great way for people to share in the life of such a well-loved local school.”

The primary pupils who were entrusted with running stalls said it was a valuable experience.

Regan Pearey said: “I think it has made some of us more mature because we can trust ourselves more with money and knowing that together we can save lives.”

Rhys Lambortini said: “I found it fun selling items to the community and working out the change.”