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Bute urged to help shape Scotland’s Rural Parliament

People living and working in rural communities have been urged to help shape the agenda for the first meeting of the Scottish Rural Parliament. Digital connectivity has, unsurprisingly, been identified as one of the major issues facing rural areas, and is a particularly acute problem in communities such as Kilchattan Bay at the south end of Bute.

People living and working in rural communities have been urged to help shape the agenda for the first meeting of the Scottish Rural Parliament. Digital connectivity has, unsurprisingly, been identified as one of the major issues facing rural areas, and is a particularly acute problem in communities such as Kilchattan Bay at the south end of Bute.

People living and working on Bute are being invited to help set the agenda for the inaugural meeting of Scotland’s first rural parliament.

Emma Cooper, the co-ordinator of the Scottish Rural Parliament (SRP), who lives and works in Rothesay, has announced the launch of an online ‘themes survey’ through which everyone with an interest in rural issues can decide which subjects should be treated with greatest importance at the SRP’s first meeting, being held in Oban in November.

Research on rural issues indicates ten topics which may be considered priorities, including transport, broadband, housing, deliveries, community confidence and changing populations. The big question is, which of these do you think are the most important for the Scottish Rural Parliament to consider?

You can submit your answers in a simple online survey - just click here to complete the form.

There will be opportunities for people to contribute to the debates on these topics between now and November with a regular Twitter debate and chances to nominate a project for or even to win the new Rural Innovators Award. Watch out too for local events coming up soon.

“As well as writing to the community groups and community councils that have registered with us,” Emma said, “we will liaise directly with national bodies with a rural membership.

“Social media will be important and people can connect with us on Facebook and Twitter. We will run monthly discussions on Twitter and highlight innovative projects through our monthly award. Award winners receive a free place at the Rural Parliament event where they can spread the word about their project.

“We are setting up a long-term project here. Rural parliaments normally meet every two years, but the process between each is just as important.”

Click here to find out more about the Scottish Rural Parliament.

 

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